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Youngest British terrorist sentenced for neo-Nazi manuals stash

|News, Terrorism

A boy from Cornwall who committed his first terror offence when he was 13 years old has been sentenced today.

The teenage neo-Nazi downloaded a manual on how different types of compounds can be used to cause explosions in July 2018. Over time he collected other electronic documents including ones giving instructions on how to make napalm, Molotov cocktails, learn knife fighting skills, and how to build an AK47 assault rifle using readily available supplies.

He was given a 24-month youth rehabilitation order, which is a community sentence with strict requirements.

The teen giving a Nazi salute. Photo taken in 2019 when he was 14 years-old
The teen giving a Nazi salute.
Photo taken in 2019 when he was 14

Jenny Hopkins, from the CPS, said: “People will rightly be disturbed that a 13-year-old should hold the most appalling neo-Nazi beliefs and start collecting manuals on bomb-making and firearms.

“He claimed not to have racist views and just wanted to appear ‘cool’, but the body of evidence led to him pleading guilty to possession and dissemination of terrorist material.”

He also become the British head of an international online neo-Nazi group called Feuerkrieg Division (FKD). The British cell was called FKD_GB and was formed in June 2019, when he was just 14. At the time of his arrest a month later it had six members.

When police arrested him at the home of his grandmother, who he lived with, they found a Nazi flag and “1488” painted on the shed. The number is a Nazi rallying cry. The “14” refers to a white supremacist slogan and the “88” to the eighth letter of the alphabet – HH – or “Heil Hitler”.

On various far-right chat forums in 2019 he posted messages about killing gay people, Jews and non-whites using nail bombs, firearms and other methods.

He told arresting officers that he did not have racist, homophobic or anti-Semitic views but wanted “to look cool” and “to look like [he] was doing something for the cause”.

Despite this he pleaded guilty to two counts of disseminating terrorist publications and 10 counts of possessing such publications. The more serious dissemination offences related to sharing a poster of a nuclear explosion over the Houses of Parliament in the context of praising those who commit racially motivated mass murder. The other was sharing with the leader of the FKD, who was known as “Commander”, a 432-page guerrilla warfare manual that advocated murder and rape.

Prosecution evidence presented to the Old Bailey during his sentencing described how the FKD views all non-white people as “sub-humans” and its stated desire is for a “white jihad”. FKD approves of genocide against non-white people, and otherwise encourages violence against non-white people through its propaganda.

Notes to editors

  • The youth was born on 30/07/2004 and is 16 years old now
  • Jenny Hopkins is the Head of the Special Crime and Counter Terrorism Division in the CPS which prosecutes all terrorism cases in England and Wales
  • The media is reminded that reporting restrictions remain in place in accordance with section 45 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999
  • Previously, in an unrelated case, a boy from Lancashire planned an Anzac Day terror attack on police officers in Australia when he was 14. He was sentenced in August 2015 when he was 15 years old.

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