CPS considers a retrial in Hull conspiracy to murder case

01/10/2013

Following the trial of Lisa Fairpo in which the jury were unable to reach a majority verdict, the CPS is considering whether to pursue a retrial against her in relation to a conspiracy to murder her husband Andrew Burr.

 The two week trial led to the conviction of Darren Wilson for conspiracy to murder, conspiracy to commit arson and being concerned in the production of a class B drug. The prosecution also led to Mikail Ward, the hitman hired by Darren Wilson, pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit murder.

Mikail Ward claimed he was promised £10,000 for the murder. However, he soon got cold feet and contacted the police to tell his story unravelling a wider network of criminality.

As the case developed it became apparent that Darren Wilson was the head of an organised crime gang growing cannabis in a number of properties in Hull.

Brian Clark was the reviewing lawyer:

"This case came to attention of the police when the planned hit man spilled the beans and set the ball rolling for a prosecution relating to arson, murder, and drugs.

"He was prosecuted along with the others but on the day before the trial he pleaded guilty and became the principal crown witness giving evidence against his accomplices.

"He told us about the plans the others had hatched to force people out of their homes. This included two petrol bomb attacks on a house in Hull on New Years Eve and New Years Day. Fortunately no one was injured and the damage was minor but the threat was there. The person who threw the petrol bombs is yet to be identified but Darren Wilson and Dean Armstrong have been found out for their role in conspiring to commit arson.

"Dean Armstrong pleaded guilty on the first day of the trial and Darren Wilson was found guilty today.

"Others have pleaded guilty to their part in growing cannabis including Wilsons cousin who allowed her house (purchased by Wilson) to be used for the production of cannabis.

"Were now considering whether to pursue a retrial against Lisa Fairpo and have seven days to make a decision."