Six men jailed for conspiracy to supply drugs - Reading

04/04/2012

Six men have been sentenced to a combined total of over 46-years at Reading Crown Court today, Wednesday, 04 April 2012, for their part in a conspiracy to supply heroin between Reading and Wales.

Nicholas Somers, aged 23, of Mitchell Terrace, Pontnewynydd, Gwent; Tobias Mills, aged 22, of Jamaica Circle, Coedkernew, Newport; Damien Cadogan, aged 28, of Anson Crescent, Whitley, Reading, and Tajudeen Anjorin, aged 36, of Helston Gardens, Whitley, Reading, were all found guilty of their involvement in the conspiracy to supply heroin following a six-week trial.  Cadogan was also found guilty of possessing a section 5 firearm.

Dominic Isaacs, aged 21, of Aberthaw Drive, Newport, Gwent, and Bradleigh Scawthorn, aged 21, of Fairoak Avenue, Newport, Gwent, pleaded guilty to their role in the conspiracy to supply heroin at an earlier court hearing.

Somers was sentenced to five years and six months imprisonment.

Mills was sentenced to two years and six months imprisonment.

Cadogan was sentenced to five years imprisonment for the drug offence and five years imprisonment for the firearms offence, to be served consecutively, making a total of 10 years imprisonment.

Anjorin was sentenced to 11 years imprisonment.

Issacs was sentenced to nine years imprisonment.

Scawthorn was sentenced to five years and six months imprisonment for this offence, and three years and four months imprisonment for an offence of possession with intent to supply class A drugs, which he had previously pleaded guilty to at Cardiff Crown Court. Both sentences will be served consecutively, giving a total sentence of eight years and 10 months.

On 17 February 2011, police detained Isaacs, Somers, Mills, and Scawthorn in a car at Membury Services on the M4. Officers found half a kilogram of heroin in the car.

The four men had driven from Newport in Wales that evening to collect it from the home of Cadogan in Whitley, Reading.  It was being stored at that location by Cadogan and Anjorin.  A handgun was later found by police in Cadogan's garden.  Both the heroin and the gun had been wrapped in kitchen towel, which had come from Cadogan's home.

The drugs consisted of a wholesale package worth about £10,000 at that stage of the supply chain.  It would inevitably have been bulked up and then broken down into street deals, which could have been worth up to £75,000.

Detective Inspector Mark Sinclair, of the Serious Organised Crime Unit (SOCU), said: "These six men were involved in an organised conspiracy to supply heroin to communities in both Reading and Wales.

"We carried out a full and thorough inquiry into the activities of the men involved in this drugs supply operation and were able to gather enough evidence against them to enable the jury to find them guilty of the charges against them.

"Once again, these prosecutions should act as a clear warning to anyone involved in the supply of illegal drugs in the Thames Valley area, that we can and will uncover your activities and bring you to justice."

Baljit Ubhey OBE, Chief Crown Prosecutor for Thames and Chiltern Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said: "A thorough police investigation revealed regular telephone contact between Isaacs in Wales and Anjorin and Cadogan in Reading.  Isaacs and Scawthorn had travelled east to Reading on several occasions prior to 17 February 2011 and Anjorin and Cadogan had previously travelled west along the M4 to Newport.

"It is believed Anjorin was in part behind the supply of the drugs to the Welsh contingent, who would have supplied it on down the chain in Wales.  Cadogan was the middle man, and had access to a gun, as people involved in the drugs trade often do, to enforce deals, or to protect themselves from others interested in operating in the market of class A drugs.

"Thanks to the actions of the police and the work of the prosecution team, a substantial quantity of heroin has been removed from the supply chain, an unlawfully held firearm has been recovered, these lawless men have been removed from society for a substantial period, and the public has been made safe from their dangerous, harmful, and life destroying activities."