Homeless man jailed for nail file attack - Luton

11/02/2016

A homeless man, who repeatedly attacked his victim with a nail file was jailed for 4 years today, Thursday, 11 February 2016.

Victor Matthew, aged 51, was in a temper after leaving the Noah Enterprise welfare centre in Park Street, Luton when he came across a group of men, who had been to a funeral. Without warning or provocation, he began hitting the victim, who was drinking beer with the other men in the multi-storey car park at the back of The Mall shopping centre.

Prosecutor Mark Hunsley told Luton Crown Court: "It felt like punches, but in his hand was a nail file with a four inch blade. He repeatedly struck him across his ear and the back of his head."

The victim went to the ground and was stamped on three times by Matthew, who left him in a pool of blood. Two of the group had hidden behind a wall when the attack began, but another went to the victim's aid and was pushed over a wall by Matthew.

The victim, who was treated in hospital for 10 superficial wounds to the back of his head and ear, said he was now scared to walk the street.

Matthew, of no fixed address, pleaded guilty to causing grievous bodily harm (GBH) with intent, having an offensive weapon and assault by beating on 27 November last year. He appeared via a video link from Bedford prison.

Tayo Hassan, defending, asked for credit for his guilty plea. At the time she said Matthew was homeless and had been 'wound up' after a row at Noah Enterprise. "It was not planned. He completely lost control and deeply regrets dealing with the situation in that way," she said. Five years earlier, Matthew had been the victim of an acid attack and had suffered depression, she said. She said the father of two had been offered work as a DJ.

Jailing him, Judge Stuart Bridge said: "It was an unprovoked attack without any due warning. It is fortunate the injuries were not more serious. He was powerless to defend himself."

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