Advanced Search

The Role of The Crown Prosecution Service

The Crown Prosecution Service is the government department responsible for prosecuting criminal cases investigated by the police in England and Wales.

As the principal prosecuting authority in England and Wales, we are responsible for:

  • advising the police on cases for possible prosecution
  • reviewing cases submitted by the police
  • determining any charges in more serious or complex cases
  • preparing cases for court
  • presenting cases at court

Find out more about the role of the Crown Prosecution Service

Support for Victims and Witnesses

Being a victim or a witness to a crime is not easy, but, with your help, we work hard to bring offenders to justice. Throughout the justice process we will support you and treat you with dignity.

The aim of witness care units is to provide a single point of contact for Victims and Witnesses, minimising the stress of attending court and keeping  victims and witnesses up to date with any news in a way that is convenient to them.

Witnesses are essential to successful prosecutions and we are committed to making the process as straightforward as we can.

Read the fact sheet about witness care units

Find out more about being a witness

CPS statement on conviction of Irfan Patel

07/09/2012

Irfan Patel, a teacher at a Lancashire mosque, pleaded guilty to four counts of child cruelty. He was given a 40 week sentence, suspended for 18 months.

Nazir Afzal, Chief Crown Prosecutor, North West Area said: "Irfan Patel was in a position of trust to the children in his class and his actions went far beyond what was acceptable in disciplining those in his care. His treatment of the children to whom he was supposed to be providing spiritual teaching and guidance amounted to systematic bullying. They were very young boys who should have expected to be safe when they attended classes at the mosque.

"The punishment that Irfan Patel used was not appropriate chastisement, it was assault and bullying and it is a crime. I hope that this case and other convictions of teachers for assaulting pupils in mosques will give young people and their parents the confidence to report this sort of bullying and ill treatment. I hope it will also serve as a reminder to others who are using similar punishments that we will prosecute where the police refer evidence to us of assaults or ill treatment of children, wherever it happens."

Ends