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12 years for human traffickers who conned young woman

11/07/2014

Three people who trafficked a young Nigerian woman into the UK intent on prostituting her in Italy were jailed for a combined total of 12 years at the Old Bailey today [Friday, 11 July].

In September 2011, the victim, then 23-years-old, was smuggled into the UK from Nigeria on a false passport after being promised that she would be accommodated and educated in England.

But there were no education prospects or jobs waiting for the victim when she arrived in London and weeks later she was forced to board a Milan-bound flight, destined to work as a prostitute.

Italian immigration officers stopped her at Milan airport after noticing her false passport and returned her to the UK that afternoon. She was met by UK Border Agency officials and, after it became apparent she was a victim of trafficking, an investigation was launched by the then Serious Organised Crime Agency, now known as the National Crime Agency.

Elizabeth Jenkins, Deputy Head of Organised Crime at the Crown Prosecution Service, said: "Life had been incredibly hard for the victim following her father's death in 2008. She hoped to make a better life for herself in England but the illusion was shattered by Oluwafemi, Olayinka and Obadiaru, who callously conned her.

"Her dreams of training as a nurse were soon pierced by a sickening realisation that she was to be prostituted in Italy - a horrific reality from which she had no means of escape until she was stopped by immigration authorities.

"This victim was taken advantage of in the cruellest fashion. This was a truly disturbing case but, thanks to the bravery of the victim in giving evidence against them, the perpetrators have been brought to justice."

Olusoji Oluwafemi was sentenced to a total of six years and six months' imprisonment.

Johnson Olayinka was sentenced to a total of four years and six months' imprisonment.

Florence Obadiaru was sentenced to a total of two years' imprisonment.

Charges:

Johnson Olayinka and Olusoji Oluwafemi were each convicted of:

  • One count of conspiracy to traffick a person into the United Kingdom for the purpose of sexual exploitation, contrary to section 1(1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977
  • One count of conspiracy to traffick a person out of the United Kingdom for the purpose of sexual exploitation, contrary to section 1(1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977
  • One count of conspiracy to possess false identity documents with an improper intention, contrary to section 1(1) of the Criminal Law Act, 1977.

Florence Obadiaru was convicted of:

  • One count of conspiracy to traffick a person into the United Kingdom for the purpose of sexual exploitation, contrary to section 1(1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977
  • One count of conspiracy to traffick a person out of the United Kingdom for the purpose of sexual exploitation, contrary to section 1(1) of the Criminal Law Act 1977.

Ends

Notes to Editors

  1. For media enquiries call the CPS Press Office on 020 3357 0906; Out of Hours Pager 07699 781 926
  2. The CPS consists of 13 Areas in total, each headed by a Chief Crown Prosecutor (CCP). In addition, there are four national casework divisions: Central Fraud, Welfare Rural & Health, Special Crime & Counter Terrorism and Organised Crime. A 'virtual' 14th Area is CPS Direct which provides charging decisions to all police forces and other investigators across England and Wales - it operates twenty-four hours, seven days a week, 365 days a year.
  3. At 31 March 2013 we employed a workforce of approximately 6840 staff (full time equivalent), including around 2350 prosecutors and 4110 caseworkers and administrators. Further information can be found on our website:  www.cps.gov.uk.
  4. The CPS, together with ACPO and media representatives, has developed a Protocol for the release of prosecution material to the media. This sets out the type of prosecution material that will normally be released, or considered for release, together with the factors we will take into account when considering requests. Read the Protocol for the release of prosecution material to the media.