Further case background

The four victims in the case were all vulnerable Slovak women - many from poverty-stricken backgrounds. All had been brought over to the UK from Slovakia (an EU member state) by the organised criminal network in order to marry Indian or Pakistani men, thus providing the men with the means to remain in the UK. Some of the women believed they had been brought to the country for legitimate work.

Slavery & Trafficking Prevention Orders

The Modern Slavery Act came into force on 31 July 2015. The Act introduced new powers which will help police in preventing or prohibiting convicted defendants from activities which enabled them to commit offences of human trafficking or slavery and forced labour. The new powers will also assist in restricting activities of people who have not yet been convicted but there is a risk that someone may commit an offence.

These new orders are called Slavery and Trafficking Prevention Orders and Slavery and Trafficking Risk Orders (STPOs and STROs). Slavery and Trafficking Prevention Orders are civil orders which the court can impose if a defendant has been convicted of a trafficking or slavery offence and the court is satisfied that there is a risk the defendant may commit further offences and it is necessary to protect others from harm.

Breach of Prevention and Risk Orders is an offence punishable with up to five years imprisonment. Prevention Orders can be applied for by the prosecutor on conviction as part of the sentence, to protect the public by preventing or restricting defendants activities. Eg. working as a gangmaster, travel to specified countries, working with children.

The CPS works with the police and prosecuting counsel to develop prohibitive and restrictive provisions for the court to consider when making a Prevention Order. The evidence to support convictions will be used to support the Prevention Order to prohibit their activities used in trafficking and exploiting their victims. This will be effective when they have completed their sentence and will last up to five years.

London’s first Slavery & Trafficking Prevention Orders issued

15/01/2016

The Crown Prosecution Service today (January 15th) successfully applied for the first Slavery & Trafficking Prevention Orders (STPOs) to be issued in London, which were imposed on four people for their part in trafficking vulnerable Slovakian women into the UK to sell them into sham marriages.

STPOs are new civil orders which enable the court to impose both restrictions and positive requirements upon those convicted of a relevant offence. To date only one other STPO has been made, at Warrington Crown Court on the 11th of December 2015. The Orders imposed are the first to include extra-territorial restrictions to stop them from entering an area of Slovakia called Lunik IX, where the women were trafficked from. The Slovakian police have agreed to monitor the orders and bring any breach to the attention of the UK authorities.

The members of the gang were sentenced at the Central Criminal Court on 23rd December (see sentence breakdown below) for their offences. Roman Ziga, 26, his brother Jozef Ziga, 28, and Igor Boros, 43, all Slovak nationals from Kosice, Slovakia, were found guilty after trial in August 2015 of, between them, trafficking four women from their home country. Roman Ziga was found not guilty of involvement in trafficking and immigration offences in relation to one of the victims.

Three other gang members based in the UK - Tibor Suchy, 29, Rene Sana, 31, and Viktoria Sanova, 29, - were previously convicted of trafficking one of the women. They pleaded guilty to trafficking the other three women at the beginning of the trial that concluded in August 2015.

Roman Ziga, Jozef Ziga, Boros and Suchy were the subject of the orders imposed by HHJ Michael Topolski QC on January 15th.

Damaris Lakin, CPS London reviewing lawyer, said: "The CPS worked closely with the police and prosecuting counsel in developing prohibitive and restrictive provisions for the Court to consider when making a Prevention Order against each defendant. We are pleased that the Court has today imposed these Orders, which demonstrate our commitment to working with police partners not just to prosecute these individuals who commit these crimes, but ensure there are measures in place to prevent them reoffending on their release.

"Using these supplementary legal measures available to us through the Modern Slavery Act we aim to protect vulnerable women from being trafficked and exploited in this way and this reinforces our on-going commitment to stamping out attempts to bypass immigration laws."

The terms of the Orders include restricting the individuals they can travel to the UK with, to members of their immediate family and/or household; restrictions on organising transport and/or accommodation for any person other than members of their immediate family and/or household until further order; and requirements to report to the local police station on arrival. These Orders will come into force at the point they are released from prison.

Sentences
The following entered guilty pleas before trial
  • Suchy on a count of conspiracy to traffick women sentence of 2 years and 10 months
  • Sana on a count of conspiracy to commit immigration offences by arranging for women to enter into sham marriages was sentenced to 2 years
Guilty after trial

Roman Ziga:

  • Count of conspiracy to traffic women into the UK - 4 years
  • Count of conspiracy to facilitate a breach of immigration law in respect of women - 2.5 years (to run consecutively) 
  • Total of 6.5 years

Jozef Ziga:

  • Count 1: conspiracy to traffic women into the UK 4 years (count 1)
  • Count 2: conspiracy to traffic a woman into the UK  2.5 years consecutive to count 1
  • Count 3: conspiracy to facilitate a breach of immigration law in respect of women 2.5 years concurrent to counts 1 and 2
  • Count 4: conspiracy to facilitate a breach of immigration law in respect of a woman 2.5 years concurrent to counts 1 and 2 and 3
  • Total 6.5 years

Igor Boros:

  • Conspiracy to traffic a woman into the UK 21 months
  • Conspiracy to facilitate a breach of immigration law in respect of a woman 21 months consecutive
  • Total of 3.5 years

Sanova on a count of conspiracy to commit immigration offences by arranging for women to enter into sham marriages received 11 months.